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  2. Sesame Street Season 48
    Sesame Street's 48th season officially began Saturday November 18 on HBO. After you see the new episodes, post here and let us know your thoughts.

A Breakdown of the Series' Timeline

Discussion in 'Sesame Street' started by D'Snowth, Oct 12, 2013.

  1. D'Snowth

    D'Snowth Well-Known Member

    Big Bird lampshaded this once! Back in 2003, Animal Planet had this countdown special of the top 50 greatest TV animals of all time (Big Bird was either #16 or #15... Kermit was definitely #2), and when interviewing him, he talked about how much he loved living on Sesame Street, but said that he wished he had a cover or something to put over his nest, "Everytime it rains, I get soaked!"

    But that brings to mind something that I don't understand... in the early years, Big Bird has a ceiling fan hanging directly over his nest... how is that possible? I mean, aside from the fan probably hanging from the lighting grid or something inside the studio, that is?
     
    MikaelaMuppet likes this.
  2. cjd874

    cjd874 Well-Known Member

    Plus, when it snows, Big Bird's nest area still gets wet. He probably has a shovel to dig out his toy chest, barrels, bags of birdseed, and everything else that's not tucked away safely. He must be freezing too, since he doesn't have four walls OR a roof surrounding him. And it must also be bad for the Bird when it gets really windy…I wonder if he's stayed in the 123 apartment on those occasions?

    In addition to that ceiling fan, there's also the tire swing that was in the arbor area/courtyard for many years. I never understood how it was supposed to hang down. Wouldn't there have to be a long pole or tree branch (with a nearby tree, of course) in order for that to be possible?
     
  3. D'Snowth

    D'Snowth Well-Known Member

    As far as cold weather goes, Big Bird does have electric blankets and heating pads in his nest to keep him warm, as Maria pointed out in CEOSST.

    As for windy conditions, remember, he spent the night with Gordon and Susan as the hurricane blew through.
     
  4. D'Snowth

    D'Snowth Well-Known Member

    And as far as ATC goes, we know for a fact that at least the park is still in use, because how many times in recent seasons have we seen Elmo and Zoe or Telly and Baby Bear, or really any other characters hanging out at the park?
     
  5. muppet maniac

    muppet maniac Well-Known Member

    I always divided the different eras into two groups:

    Pre-1973 (Early seasons)
    This were the "experimental" years, when the show was new and they were trying things out. Seasons 1-3 were, as TVTropes would describe it, "Early Installment Weirdness"; while a good chunk of now classic moments came from these early episodes, there were some things that would have anyone born after this period
    go "what?" and in some cases scream like the Nostalgia Critic after he saw "Baby Arnold". Things started to shape up a bit between seasons 4 and 5 (with the addition of characters like The Count, the debut of Newsflash, Snuffy given his modern look) but like the seasons beforehand, it's not all the way there (Gordon still having hair and being played by a different actor, segments repeating themselves multiple times - although they did do segment repeats as late as the New Mexico episodes from season 7, interestingly enough)

    Post-1973 (Later seasons)
    This is the Sesame Street everyone is most familiar with, regardless of which year they grew up in.

    * 6-11; 12-14
    * Post-Hooper (15-20)
    * Seasons 21, 22-23, 24
    * Around the Corner (25-29)
    * EW (30, 31-32)
    * New Format (33; 34-37)
    * Word on the Street (38; 39, 40-today)
     
  6. minor muppetz

    minor muppetz Well-Known Member

    One thing that's recently hit me about various eras is that, when it comes to decades, I prefer the early part of the decade over the later half.

    I prefer seasons 1-5 over 6-10, seasons 11-15 over 16-20, and seasons 21-25 over seasons 26-30. But having said that, my preference is the opposite for the 2000s, preferring most of seasons 36-40 over seasons 31-35 (and I feel like the current seasons are great... Will seasons 46-50 not be as good?).
     
  7. D'Snowth

    D'Snowth Well-Known Member

    I never really thought about that. Alls I know is that as far back as my memory goes, I very much enjoy from about 1984-85 up to 92, as I've mentioned before.

    But, starting with Season 30, and up to 38 (I've hardly seen any of 39-44), here's how I'd rank 'em:

    Season 30: First half great, second half not too much.
    Season 31: Don't remember much, I was starting to fall off the bandwagon by then.
    Season 32: Mostly good; was the beginning of my "born again Muppet Freak" phase.
    Season 33: Rocky, took a while to adjust, but was also mostly good.
    Season 34: Great.
    Season 35: Some good episodes, but a mostly meh season.
    Season 36: Great.
    Season 37: Sucked.
    Season 38: Great, and a fun season too with all the experimental episodes.
     
  8. MikaelaMuppet

    MikaelaMuppet Well-Known Member

    Season 30: Great.

    Season 31: OK, but not the best.

    Season 32: Some episodes are good. Others not so good.

    Season 33: One of the better seasons.

    Season 34: Another one of the better seasons.

    Season 35: Meh season. However, the Furry Red Monster parade is the best episode.
     
  9. minor muppetz

    minor muppetz Well-Known Member

  10. minor muppetz

    minor muppetz Well-Known Member

    In the past few days when full scene rundowns for the first few episodes were added to Muppet Wiki, I've noticed something that I don't think had been pointed out about the first season: It was common for the show to have a segment with one of the adults reading an existing children's book. As far as I can tell, these readings were only featured in one episode each (there's no evidence that any were repeated, Muppet Wiki doesn't list the same stories in multiple episodes, and the CTW Archives "first season show content" doesn't list these stories among the many insert segments from the first season). And these children books were also "sponsors" in addition to the letters and numbers.

    And now that there's a full guide to episode five, it seems like at first in the episodes with end credits, a segment for each letter and number sponsor would follow an announcement of each sponsor. The fifth episode didn't even mention number sponsors (though the numbers 2 and 3 only got one segment each, maybe that episode didn't really have number sponsors). I think there's another first season episode that doesn't announce number sponsors. It seems like the practice of showing segments after each individual sponsor was announced ended by the time of episode 115.

    And was it also pointed out how in the first season there would often be segments with the cast observing live animals on the street?
     
  11. D'Snowth

    D'Snowth Well-Known Member

    They still occasionally did that up through the 90s.
     
  12. minor muppetz

    minor muppetz Well-Known Member

    I guess now we're going to be at the start of a new era, with the show airing on HBO and being only 30 minutes, in addition to the new set and retirement of Sonia Manzano (and Fran Brill).
     
  13. Pig's Laundry

    Pig's Laundry Well-Known Member

    And now the show will certainly be different in season 47 without Joey Mazzirino
     
  14. Pig's Laundry

    Pig's Laundry Well-Known Member

    Wow,that scene sounds amazing, I hope somebody finds it and puts it on the internet soon.
     
  15. Pig's Laundry

    Pig's Laundry Well-Known Member

    Season 39 was my favorite recent season. It had some really creative storylines,a nice mix of characters,the HD filming looked great with the new set,lot's of Big Bird, some great songs,Leela was a great addition to the cast. And while we had some really boring episodes such as "Elmo and Zoe's Hat Contest", "Firefly Show" and ''Max the Magician'' , we also got some very interesting and experimental episodes like "Mine-Itis". The pacing in the street scenes was really good and I really liked the overall format with multiple short street scenes similar to the pre season 33 era,it allowed for more stories to be told and it also allowed for more characters to appear in each episode.
     
  16. Pig's Laundry

    Pig's Laundry Well-Known Member

    Since, I assume season 47 will be basically the same in format as season 46, should we count it as two different eras because of the change in head writers?
     
  17. D'Snowth

    D'Snowth Well-Known Member

    It's all subjective to your own personal opinions. Looking over my OP, I would adjust it to say that Whatever Comes After Copper #2 is now 2008-2014/5, and that as of 2016 and present is Whatever Comes After Copper #3, because it's definitely an era all it's own . . . it's almost an entirely different show now, between the new set, the completely different format (hour to half-hour), the move to HBO, the scaling back of characters both Muppet and human, the turnover in staff, what have you.
     
  18. Pig's Laundry

    Pig's Laundry Well-Known Member

    I guess i'll count it as the same era considering we lump the entire "Around the Corner" period together even though the head writer changed from Norman Stiles to Lou Berger in season 29.
     
  19. minor muppetz

    minor muppetz Well-Known Member

    You can choose how you want, or maybe you can lump certain eras into parts (like how some of us have included the first season as among the early years, but sort of made the first season a separate "part" regardless).

    With my breakdown of the series timeline, I've mostly focused on on-screen stuff. I don't think I thought up many behind-the-scenes things (aside from things about Muppet performers).
     
  20. mbmfrog

    mbmfrog Active Member

    If I may add about the Maria and Luis clip by saying that maybe it was a special moment in the Show's history and that they required to have most of the majority characters making an appearance during the ceremony and that includes Frank and Jim's major characters.
     

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