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Flippersteps in the Sand

Discussion in 'Fan Fiction and Fan Art' started by TogetherAgain, Mar 30, 2006.

  1. The Count Moderator

    Idle threats that keep getting in the way... Why must you torture the queen this way?
    Just post more... They'll never know... At least, they won't hear it from me.
  2. TogetherAgain Well-Known Member

    Chapter Twenty-Two

    One Month and One Day Later
    August 7, 1971


    House shopping was a very interesting concept to little Robin. To start with, until this visit with Kermit, he had never been inside of a real house. But they were visiting three houses today, and Kermit had a feeling he would end up buying one of them. He wasn’t sure which one.

    The real-estate agent met them in front of the first house, and immediately reminded Kermit that this house was a little out of his price range. Then she began the tour.

    “Now as you can see, it has this nice sturdy porch, with an overhang, and it’s the full width of the house. Now we’ll go inside… There’s the bathroom on the left, living room on the right. Nice big windows, as you see. Now, past the bathroom is the kitchen, with room for a table. Two smaller windows, there and there, lots of cabinet space as you see. The stairs are over here, back of the living room. If you’ll follow me up the stairs, please…”

    Kermit held Robin’s hand as they sped through the small house and headed up the stairs. “What do you think so far, Robin?” he asked quietly.

    Robin stopped and smiled. “Half-way!”

    The tour continued on the second floor. “Full bathroom here on the right, with a shower, sink, toilet, linen closet. Bedrooms are here and here, both with closets. This one has two larger windows, that one has two smaller windows. And here we have an extra storage closet. Any questions?”

    There were none.

    “Great! Let’s go look at the yard.”

    Is there a yard?” Kermit asked.

    “Well, there’s the front yard.”

    “Well we already saw that.”

    “All right then, let’s go to the next house!”

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

    The second house did not look as good from the curb as it did on paper. The photograph had not revealed the moldy siding, the peeling paint, or the mess of ugly rocks that filled the postage-stamp sized yard. When the real-estate agent’s foot broke through the first porch step, it was clear that most of the wood was rotted through.

    “Well,” she said, “At least we know why it’s so inexpensive!”

    Kermit scrunched up his face. “I think we’ve seen enough,” he said. “Let’s go to the next house.”

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

    They circled the house before entering. “Now as you can see, it’s a very large lot,” the agent said.

    Kermit nodded. “It’s a much bigger yard than the first house,” he said.

    “Yes, it is. Shall we go inside?”

    They crossed the small stone patio and walked through the door.

    “Now this is the kitchen, with a coat closet to the left. As you can see, it’s very big, lots of space. Moving right along, the living room is here, also very big, nice big windows. Bathroom is here, with a shower, bathtub, sink, toilet, linen closet. Bedroom here, master bedroom there, the only difference being that the master bedroom has a walk-in closet, and the other bedroom does not. Any questions? No? Well then great! Now all you have to do is decide.”

    Kermit thought about it as they walked slowly towards the door. He liked this house. It had a big yard, big windows, and storage space to spare. He could imagine himself living here. He stopped and crouched down to his little nephew’s level. “Well, Robin? What do you think?”

    Robin was looking around, confused. “Uncle Kermit?” he asked quietly. “Where are the stairs?”

    Kermit hesitated. “Well- there are no stairs, Robin. There’s only one floor,” he explained.

    Robin looked up at him and frowned. “Oh,” he said. “I liked the stairs.”

    Kermit thought about it and decided, he could see himself living at the first house, too.

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

    “Uncle Kermit?” Robin asked when they were back at the apartment. “Are you gonna move everything here into the house?”

    “Well not everything,” Kermit said. “But I haven’t exactly decided what not to bring.”

    “Can I help?” Robin asked.

    “You mean right now?” Kermit said.

    “Yeah! Please?”

    Kermit shrugged. “Well sure, I guess.”

    They opened up the closet and started sorting through the boxes. Robin pointed to every label. “What’s that say?”

    “That says Christmas.”

    “What’s in it?”

    “Christmas decorations.”

    “Are you gonna keep it?”

    “Yeah, probably.”

    “What’s that say?”

    “It says… Old Scripts- Hey, Cinderella!”

    “What’s in it?”

    “Well, it’s a bunch of old scripts from Hey, Cinderella! That’s a special we did a few years ago.”

    “Like the fairy tale?”

    “Yeah, like the fairy tale.”

    “What does that say?”

    “That says… clothes.”

    “What is it?”

    “It’s an old suit I don’t wear anymore. I guess I don’t really need it.”

    “What does that say?” Robin pointed at a white box.

    Kermit gulped. Oops. He took a deep breath. “It says, Melinda and Ray.”

    “Who are they?” Robin asked. “Are they inside the box?”

    “Huh?” Kermit said. “No, they- they’re not in the box.” He frowned at the box and held it in his hands.

    Robin watched him quietly. “Why are you so sad now, Uncle Kermit?” he asked softly.

    Kermit took a deep breath and looked at his nephew. “Maybe… I should explain this,” he said slowly. He turned, walked out of the closet, went to the couch, and sat down. Robin followed him. “But… do me a favor, Robin?”

    Robin looked up at him. “Yeah?”

    “Try not to talk to anyone about this. Okay?”

    Robin looked a little excited. “So it’s like a secret?”

    “Yes,” Kermit said. “It’s a secret.”

    “Does anybody else know it?” Robin asked.

    “Well, yes, but- it’s kind of hard to explain who. So- Try not to talk about it. Okay?”

    Robin nodded. “Okay, Uncle Kermit. I won’t tell anybody,” he said. “I’m good at keeping secrets.”

    “Oh good,” Kermit said. He took a deep breath and looked at the box. “This might be hard,” he said. “I haven’t told anybody about this since… Well, since before you hatched.”

    “You haven’t talked about it at all?” Robin asked.

    “Well not very much,” Kermit said. “I’ve talked about it a little bit, but only to people who already knew. I haven’t told anybody, though.”

    Robin looked up with his wide, innocent eyes. “Maybe you should,” he said.

    “Maybe,” Kermit said quietly. “But it- it’s kind of hard to talk about it.”

    Robin watched him and waited very patiently. He seemed to understand people in a way that many adults struggled to. It was really beyond his own comprehension. But he knew the difference between big emotions and small emotions, good emotions and bad emotions. He knew that what his uncle was about to explain was a really big, really bad emotion. And he knew that when somebody shared a really big, really bad emotion, he should be really quiet. So he was.

    Kermit opened the box. “Melinda was my wife,” he said quietly. “I used to have a wife. She would’ve been your aunt. See, here- here’s a picture of her.” He pulled a photo-album out of the box and opened it up. “See? That’s Melinda. She- She was very beautiful.” He could feel the tears starting to come. “I… I love her… very much. And we… We had a son…” His eyes were wet now. He flipped through the photo-album. “There, see? That’s Ray. …That’s my son… He… He would have been your cousin.” He turned the pages one by one, smiling faintly at some of the pictures. “See this?” he pointed. “That’s our land. That’s… where we were going to… to build a house, when we had enough money. But…” He shook his head. “We never got enough money. We were so close…” His voice cracked, and the first tear escaped his left eye.

    Robin stood up in his seat and wiped the tear away as gently as Kermit wiped his. He stayed on his feet, wrapped his arms loosely around Kermit’s neck, and leaned against him. “What happened?” he whispered.

    Kermit closed the album and turned slightly to look at his nephew. “There was… an accident, Robin,” he said as more tears dripped. “A very… very bad accident. And they… they died.”

    Robin frowned. “Died?”

    Kermit nodded. “They died, they… They’re gone.”

    “And… And they can’t come back?” Robin asked.

    “No,” Kermit said. “They can never come back.”

    “Never ever?”

    Kermit shook his head. “Never ever.” He wrapped his arms around Robin and fought to hold back the bulk of his tears.

    Robin cuddled closer to him. “Uncle Kermit?” he said. “What happened to all your other tadpoles?”

    Kermit hesitated. “There was a storm… before they hatched, and they all blew away,” he said. “Every single one, except for Ray. He was the only one left.”

    “That’s sad,” Robin said.

    “Yes. It’s very sad.”

    Robin let go of his uncle, wiggled out of his arms, and looked in the box. He pulled out a framed picture. “Is that you?” he asked.

    “Mm-hm,” Kermit said. “That’s the three of us- me, Melinda, and Ray.” Kermit was in the center of the picture, with Melinda seated in front of him, and Ray on his shoulder. It was a professional portrait, taken just a month or so before The Accident.

    Robin shuffled through the box and pulled out something soft. “What’s that?” he asked.

    “It’s a teddy bear,” Kermit said. “It used to be Ray’s.”

    Robin looked at it carefully. He hugged it, a loving, sympathetic hug, as if it had just awoken from a nightmare. Then he gingerly set it back in the box, turned, and solemnly looked up at his uncle. “I think we should keep this box,” he said.

    Kermit smiled a frail smile at him. “I think so, too,” he said. He wiped the last of his tears away. “Let’s take a break and get some dinner. Okay?”

    “Okay,” Robin said. They closed up the box and set it on the coffee table. “Uncle Kermit?”

    “Yes, Robin?”

    “How come you don’t have a ring?”

    Kermit looked at him. “Pardon?”

    “Well, Jim- I mean Mr. Henson- I mean… Jim…” Robin squirmed a little. “He has a wife, and he’s got a ring that means he’s married. I asked him about it once.”

    Kermit nodded. “That’s right. Jim has a wedding ring,” he said.

    “Well… If you were married, then- why don’t you have a ring?”

    “Well it’s just different traditions,” Kermit explained. “Melinda and I didn’t have rings. Most frogs don’t. Your parents don’t have rings, and they’re married. Same with Grandma and Grandpa. But most humans get rings when they get married.”

    Robin hesitated. “Okay,” he said.

    Kermit nodded, then stopped. “You’ll remember not to talk about Ray and Melinda, won’t you?”

    “Of course!” Robin said.

    “Good,” Kermit said. “Let’s go get some dinner.”

    They left the apartment and headed down the stairs, pausing only once- “Half-way!”
  3. Muppet Matt Active Member

    Poor Kermit!:cry: *Gives Kermit a hug*:( Great chapter Lisa I love the "Half-way" thing.;)
  4. The Count Moderator

    So... Guess the "Halfway" from Robin whenever there are stairs will become the newest running gag?
    And there was a lot of courage on Kermit's part to open up that box and talk about Melinda and Ray to Robin... But the part I liked the most was when Robin took the teddy bear and gave it a hug, as if it awoke from a long nightmare... Now why does that remind me of your reactions to certain other stories?
    Loved it, and I hope for more... Though I wonder just where the story's going. Don't get me wrong, it's great and we want more of course... But if it keeps going, then how will you spin it into a trilogy or even a quintology?
  5. ReneeLouvier Active Member

    *Hugs Lisa* Aw...such a sad...sweet chapter! *Is kinda speechless otherwise*
  6. Beauregard Well-Known Member

    Hey Cinderella!!!

    I'm sorry, I should be crying here, but, Hey Cinderella!

    Ok, halfway, stairs, house buying, shoe through porch, and IS that the boading house or not? Then we have tears, lots of tiny tears, and Robin wiping them away, and OMG! No! You cannot use Teddy Bears to make me sad!!! I'd never do that to you! *innocent*

    Hey Cinderella!!!
  7. TogetherAgain Well-Known Member

    A very good question! Hopefully, I've got a good enough answer to match it.

    The trouble is, I can't very well tell you how I'll spin a whole series out of this without giving away the whole story. And believe me, I have no intention of doing that. But I do intend to answer your question. Am I confusing you yet?

    Here's a rough outline of the parts:

    Part One, Flippersteps in the Sand- History of the Muppets, focusing on Kermit's personal life, September 22 1963-October 24 2006, ending with a cliffhanger of a twist that you'll hate me for. That, or you'll hate certain characters. Or you'll just hate that it's how I end part one.

    Part Two, Flippersteps of Dance- Follows the curve I threw you for at the end of part one, while creating more problems. You'll need your teddy bears for most of it. And you'll really, really hate me for some of it.

    Part Three, One Flipperstep at a Time- Fixes all those problems I created in part two, but possibly leaves just one little hole for just one little problem, just in case you want part four.

    Part Four? May or may not be written, may or may not be called Flippersteps Apart- Takes that one little problem, turns it into a big problem, and starts a really fun chain of events. Ushy-gushy fans would like this part, but it doesn't completely tie up all the loose ends.

    Part Five? May or may not be written, possible title is confidential, just in case part four is written- Ties up all those loose ends, probably mostly comedy, pretty much just a feel-good-all-over part.

    Part Six? May or may not be written, may or may not be called Forgotten Flippersteps- takes some itsy-bitsy loop-holes that you didn't notice, and explodes them into something huge.

    There, see? I think that pretty much answered your question, but I didn't give TOO much away. At least I don't think I did. I hope I didn't. I love pulling the rug out from under you. Oh, I'm going to have so much fun!

    Anyway, I'm not completely decided yet as to whether or not I'll write part four, much less parts five and six. I'm really leaving that up to all of you. We'll see, I guess. But what am I talking about? I've still got us in 1971, and here I am babbling about whether or not I'll delve into 2010! I've got some writing to do...
  8. ReneeLouvier Active Member

    Good gracious! *gears herself up for a good year or two of reading when it eventually comes to all that great reading coming out*

    I can't wait!
  9. Beauregard Well-Known Member

    Oh! Wow, exciting, 2010? What can happen between then and now? Loop-holes? Are they anything like worm-holes? Or Donut-holes?
  10. The Count Moderator

    Well... Since you haven't let us down yet through all the heartbrakes and teddy bears and celebrations and all that other stuff... Trusting you to know what you're doing and I hope we get more story soon. The sooner you post, the sooner we can get to Part 2.
  11. TogetherAgain Well-Known Member

    Oh, and I forgot! At the beginning of part three, "One Flipperstep at a Time," there's another problem before everything gets fixed. Well actually, the fixing starts at the end of part two, and then there's a problem at the beginning of part three, and THEN everything gets fixed. I'm surprised I forgot to mention that problem, it's a VERY big problem, but... Yeah. Part two is the main problem part. You'll want to keep your teddy bears within arm's reach, at the farthest, and a box of tissues might not be a bad idea. In the mean time, in-between time, October 2, 1971 time... Well, soon, ish... Maybe later today, maybe some time tomorrow.
  12. The Count Moderator

    Heck... Just post it already child... We canna wait any longer.
  13. TogetherAgain Well-Known Member

    Chapter Twenty-Three

    Two Months Later
    October 2, 1971


    Kermit skimmed through the shelves of the children’s section of the new bookstore that had finally opened. There hadn’t been anything here for a while. The building had been up for sale for a long time. It had been a record store before, and a diner before that. He pushed the thought away.

    That’s it! He triumphantly pulled a book off the shelf and flipped through it. He stopped and grinned at a page. Then he snapped the book shut, checked the price, and carried it up to the register.

    The red-haired girl behind the register smiled prettily at him. “Will this be everything for you today?” she asked.

    “Yup, that’s everything!” he said cheerfully.

    “All right,” she said. She smiled at the book and glanced at the price. “So who is this for?”

    “It’s for my little nephew,” Kermit said.

    “Oh how sweet,” she gushed. “Is it his birthday?” She punched some buttons on the cash register.

    “Nope, he’s just coming to visit,” Kermit said.

    “Well that’s nice,” the girl said. “Are you two close?” She leaned unnecessarily forward and held her hand out. “That’ll be five twenty-five please,” she said in a playfully secretive way.

    He grinned at her and handed her a ten-dollar bill, leaning in slightly. “We’re very close,” he said.

    She smiled at him, straightened up, made change and leaned forward to hand it to him. “You must take good care of him,” she said.

    “Well, I try to take very good care of the people I’m close to,” he said as he unhesitantly dumped his change into the tip jar on the counter without breaking his gaze from hers.

    “Oh really?” she batted her eyes at him. “So do you read to your nephew often?”

    “Oh… whenever I have time,” he said a little too casually to be casual.

    “Have you read anything else by that author to him?” she asked, tapping the book between them.

    “Well no I haven’t,” he said. “Do you suggest anything by him?”

    “Yes I do,” she said. “And if your nephew likes that book, you better hop on back here and pick up a book about a little bear named Winnie-the-Pooh.”

    “I’ll be sure to do that,” Kermit smiled at her.

    “Great.” She reached forward and ran her finger down the side of his cheek. “I guess I’ll be seeing you around then, Mr. Wonderful.”

    He gulped. “My name’s Kermit,” he said.

    “Kermit,” she said. “My name is Penny.”

    “Well, it’s a pleasure to meet you, Penny,” Kermit said.

    “The pleasure is all mine,” Penny said. She drew her hand away from him. “I wish I had an uncle like you,” she said. “You know at first I thought this book might’ve been for your son.”

    “No, I-“ He caught his breath suddenly. “I don’t have a son.” He picked the book up off the counter.

    “Did you want me to gift-wrap that for you?” Penny asked sweetly.

    “No thank you, that won’t be necessary,” Kermit said. I have to get out of here.

    “All right then, I’ll see you around, Kermit,” she said.

    “Right.” He went to the door quickly. “Bye Penny.”

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

    He held his temper until he was safely inside his house. Then someone opened Pandora’s box.

    “WHAT WAS I THINKING? WHY WAS I FLIRTING WITH HER?” He angrily dropped the book on the sofa and started pacing back and forth. “Why would I do that?” He stopped, looked up, and held his hands out in partial supplication. “I’m sorry, Melinda!” he said. “I’m sorry…” He dropped his hands and then his head, and sighed. “What am I doing…” He sulked over to a new comfy chair and sat down. After a moment, he glanced at the clock and quickly hopped to his feet. “Yipes! I forgot! The whole reason I went to the bookstore!”

    He grabbed the book off the sofa and quickly flipped through to the page he had smiled at earlier, and marked it with a bookmark he had lying out on an end table. Then he walked to the foot of the stairs, counted the steps in his head, walked partway up, and set the book down. “There,” he said. “It’ll be waiting for him here. Halfway. And I have a train to catch.” He bolted up the stairs and into his room, and grabbed his banjo before hopping back down the stairs and out the door.

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

    Three Days Later
    October 5, 1971


    “So you live here now, Uncle Kermit?” Robin asked as he hopped across the front porch.

    “Yup. All moved in!” Kermit said, following close behind. “And I got all new furniture, too.”

    “Furniture?”

    “Yeah, all the stuff inside. You know, like- the tables, the chairs, the sofa, the bookcase- it’s all new stuff now.”

    “Oh, boy!”

    Kermit unlocked and opened the door. “Why don’t you take a look around, make yourself comfortable?”

    “Okay!” Robin shot inside and immediately hopped onto and across the sofa.

    Kermit chuckled as he closed the door and leaned his banjo against the wall. Robin hopped from the sofa to the floor, from the floor to the red comfy chair, and from the comfy chair to the floor again.

    “I like it!” he proclaimed.

    “Oh, good,” Kermit said.

    Robin looked at the stairs and smiled. “Race you to half-way!” He charged.

    Kermit laughed as he bolted. Even with Robin having the advantage of half the length of the room, Kermit won the race, although not by much. “You’re getting faster,” he observed.

    “What’s this?” Robin picked up the book.

    “This is a book,” Kermit said. “It’s a gift from me to you.”

    “Oh, thanks, Uncle Kermit!” Robin looked at the cover. “What’s it say?”

    “It says, When We Were Very Young, and here it says A. A. Milne. That’s the name of the guy who wrote it. See?”

    Robin looked sad. “Well, I can’t read it,” he said glumly.

    “Oh that’s okay. I can teach you to read,” Kermit said.

    Robin looked up excitedly. “You can?”

    “Well sure!” Kermit said. “We can start right here- I want to show you this page.” He opened the book to the page he had marked. “Let’s take a look at this…”

    Robin crawled into his lap and eagerly examined the page.

    “Do you know the ABCs?” Kermit asked.

    “I think so,” Robin said hesitantly. “A, B, C, D… um…”

    “You want me to sing the song with you?” Kermit offered.

    Robin nodded, and they sang together. “A-B-C-D-E-F-G, H-“

    “Stop!” Kermit pointed to the first letter on the page. “That’s the letter H,” he said. “It makes the ‘huh’ sound.”

    “Huh,” Robin said.

    “Mm-hm, and that letter next to it is the letter A. It makes a few sounds, but in this case it makes the ‘ah’ sound.”

    “Ah.”

    “Good, now if we put those two letters together…”

    They continued slowly, examining each letter and the sound it made. It was difficult, explaining every rule of pronunciation as they came to it, and Kermit knew that, realistically, Robin would be lucky to remember any of it an hour later. He decided to teach him properly, bit by bit, some other time, and perhaps have him watch some episodes of Sesame Street while he was here. But in the mean time, it was extremely gratifying to both of them when, after ten minutes, Robin slowly sounded out the first line. “Half…wuh-ay… duh-ow-nuh… the… stuh-airs…” He slowly smiled a huge, excited smile. “Half-way-down-the-stairs!”

    “That’s right! VERY good, Robin!” Kermit hugged him ecstatically and kissed the top of his head. “That was terrific!”

    “Half-way-down-the-stairs!” Robin repeated. “I DID it, Uncle Kermit!”

    “Yes you did!” Kermit beamed. “You wanna try some more?”

    “YEAH!”

    “Great! Me too!” He pointed to the next line. “That’s the letter I. It makes a few sounds, too, but this time it says ‘ih’.”

    “Ih.”

    “Good! Now what letter is that next to it?”

    “Um-“

    “We saw that up here, remember?”

    “It’s… the letter… S!”

    “Right! And what sound does S make?”

    “Sssss…”

    Very good, Robin…”

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

    Two Weeks and Three Days Later
    October 22, 1971


    Kermit sat by himself on the middle step of his stairs with his elbows on his knees and his head in his hands, listening to the deafening silence. He had just returned from taking Robin back to the swamp, and he couldn’t get over how empty the house seemed without his little nephew. This was exactly the feeling that getting a house was supposed to remedy.

    It didn’t work.

    He sighed. Tomorrow would be an early morning, so he might as well make this an early evening. But there was one thing he had to do before he called it a night. He stood up, trudged down the stairs, went outside, got on his bicycle, and pedaled away.

    Ten minutes later, he was at a flower shop. They were getting ready to close, but he quickly and carefully picked out a dozen sunflowers and six lilies, and brought them up to the cashier. She wrapped them in pretty blue paper. “Will this be everything tonight?” she asked.

    “Yeah, that’s all,” he said sadly.

    She raised an eyebrow at his mood as she rang up the price. “Something wrong?”

    He shrugged. “I’d rather not talk about it,” he mumbled.

    She nodded understandingly. “Well, I hope everything works out for you.” She gestured to his purchase. “Maybe the flowers will help. That’ll be five dollars, please.”

    He frowned. “That doesn’t seem right,” he said.

    “They’re on sale,” she assured him.

    He shrugged. “Okay…” He paid and took the flowers. “Have a lovely evening,” he said.

    “You too, sir.” She watched as he put the flowers in the basket on his bicycle and rode away, and then she quietly slid some money out of her own pocket and into the register.

    A man watched her suspiciously from across the store. “You keep doing that, Jessie, and you’ll use up your pay check quicker’n you can count to ten,” he said.

    “I know, Papa, but he just looked so sad,” she said.

    “They all look sad, Jessie,” he said. “That’s why they come here.”
  14. ReneeLouvier Active Member

    Aw...Loved the latest chapter, Lisa.
  15. The Count Moderator

    Halfway down the stairs... The letter I, followed by the letter s...
    *Trying to sound it out: Is a s-tep wuh-er I sit?

    Loved it... Even the little sadness at the end. And are these random names you're pulling out of your family hat again?
    But it's really coming along great.
  16. Beauregard Well-Known Member

    *stunned silence is followed by only stunned silence*

    Well, first there's the bookstore, which is definatly note worthy, since it's a place that holds several very special memories for Kermit T. Frog.

    Then there's...Kermit being pulled into something he wants so much and doesn't want at all.

    HALF-WAY!!!

    Finally...the flowers...*sigh* Oh the flowers...Lillies, nice choice, see, lilli-pads...*sigh* Oh the flowers...
  17. redBoobergurl Well-Known Member

    WOWWWWWW! I just got back into town and read this and I love every word Lisa. It's so touching and sweet and wow. I liked the outline too, I can't wait to read all of what's to come. YOU ROCK!!!
  18. Beauregard Well-Known Member

    Like a Fraggle...And RULE!
  19. TogetherAgain Well-Known Member

    Yay! So glad everybody likes it!

    But, unfortunately, my dad is dissatisfied with the state of cleanliness of my room, and my choice of priorities, and thus, he intends to disconnect my internet tomorrow. <sigh.> I'll see when I can get on again.
  20. Beauregard Well-Known Member

    Nooooooooooooooooooooooo-ooooooooooo-ooooooooooooooooooooo-oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo!

    Your public needs you!

    Um...hey, look on the bright side, this will give you plenty of opppertunity to type more chapters...

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