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R.I.P. David Ogden Stiers

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by MikaelaMuppet, Mar 3, 2018.

  1. D'Snowth

    D'Snowth Well-Known Member

    I think when people speak of Frank being one-note, they're talking about how he was arguably flanderized up till his final season on the show, such as how his lack of surgical skills were played up more and more, how much whinier and crybabyish he could get at times, and how all of his thoughts were practically consumed by Margaret when she got engaged to Penobscott.

    When you look at Frank in the beginning, he's not nearly as surgically incompetent, he's more cooperative in OR, and he's even portrayed as something of a religious fanatic (albeit a hypocritical one).

    But one thing I love about Flanderized Frank is that cackling laugh of his (that Larry Linville apparently ad-libbed once, and it stuck). That, and the childish temper-tantrum he threw in Margaret's tent upon learning Potter was replacing him was hilarious.
  2. fuzzygobo

    fuzzygobo Well-Known Member

    Frank had no business being in the Army.
    He couldn't operate.
    He couldn't lead in Blake or Potter's absence.
    He couldn't operate a gun- or drive a tank for that matter.
    The best he could do at being a soldier was capturing a refugee family and an ox.
    He hurled racial slurs at Potter and Kelleye.
    He can't even tell who the North Koreans are.

    As Potter called him, "Mental pigmy".
    MuppetsRule likes this.
  3. Flaky Pudding

    Flaky Pudding Well-Known Member

    Lilo and Stitch was probably my favorite childhood show/movie series aside from Muppets and Sesame Street so of course, I'm very saddened to hear that we lost Jumba :(
    muppetgem likes this.
  4. minor muppetz

    minor muppetz Well-Known Member

    You can add him to a long list of celebrities who I thought was already dead a long time ago. I also didn't know he was in Lilo and Stitch (though I also haven't seen that film).

    M*A*S*H is a show I kinda find overrated, and I like the early seasons a lot better than the later ones (which are a bit too serious for me... and when I watch the reruns, it's usually one of the later episodes). However, Charles Winchester is one of the things from the later seasons that I like. He was a great character, much better than Frank Burns.
  5. mr3urious

    mr3urious Well-Known Member

    He also played a Russian mob boss in Jungle 2 Jungle, amusingly using the same voice he would eventually use for Jumba in Lilo & Stitch. So now I can't help but imagine Jumba cutting off people's fingers as a form of punishment. :)
  6. Princeton

    Princeton Active Member

    Jumba is the one Disney character that i feel Stiers was miscast as. I think his deep vocal tone and Russian dialect clashes with the character design. Call me a weirdo but I thought Garry Shandling would be the perfect Jumba voice.
  7. ErinAardvark

    ErinAardvark Well-Known Member

    This makes me wonder if my cousin had gotten any grief about this character, since he and Frank share a last name, and at one point, rank.
  8. MuppetsRule

    MuppetsRule Well-Known Member

  9. D'Snowth

    D'Snowth Well-Known Member

    I've only recently started following Ken Levine's blog again. I dropped out of it for a while because too many people were angered by my occasional comments against the current state of comedy unnecessarily relying so heavily on sexual content and lowbrow humor.
    MuppetsRule likes this.
  10. MuppetsRule

    MuppetsRule Well-Known Member

    Well, you do have a way of rubbing people the wrong way ;) (that's a joke)
    D'Snowth likes this.
  11. D'Snowth

    D'Snowth Well-Known Member

    Oh I know! Why, the other commentators seemed to think I was an uncultured and repressed jerk@s$. They could be right. I could have been so desensitized by the wacky and outlandish humor of comedy of yesteryears to realize just how cultured, sophisticated, and refined gratuitous sex really is! :eek:
    MuppetsRule likes this.
  12. MuppetsRule

    MuppetsRule Well-Known Member

    So many great scenes of his from MASH to pick from. This one has to be at the top of the list

    I'd also have to include the episode where he takes an interest in the patient who stutters and returns to the swamp to listen to the tapes from his sister. And the episode where Radar gives him his old stocking cap from his childhood. Winchester was much more of a real person than the cartoonish Frank Burns
  13. D'Snowth

    D'Snowth Well-Known Member

    One thing I will say is the transition between Frank and Charles was handled much, much better than Trapper and B.J.

    Though, to be fair, Wayne Rogers didn't officially leave the show until their mid-season hiatus, so I can see how they had to haphazardly write Trapper out of the show by having Hawkeye miss his plane by ten minutes when he and Radar go to pick up B.J.

    With Frank and Charles, on the other hand, bringing Charles in while there's a search for Frank, and eventually we see Potter and later Hawkeye and B.J. speak to Frank over the phone made it feel like it was at least still part of the story, if only in spirit (so to speak).

    On a somewhat related note, there's a really funny blooper from Charles's first episode at the 2:16 mark of this reel:
  14. Princeton

    Princeton Active Member

    But realism doesn't necessarily always equal entertaining, especially in a comedy series. To switch gears to another show, the most realistic character in the US Office series is Stanley Hudson. But the writers never knew what to do with him and as such over a nine year series Stanley literally had three episodes focusing on him. And what's wrong with being cartoonish? When you have a character that is as unyielding and anti-social as Frank, it's funny. People with social disorders can sometimes make for very funny characters as long as they're not written in an insulting way and the audience is still able to feel empathy for them.

    And since you brought up the episode where we discover that Honoria stutters, am I the only one that thought that really came out of left field and not in a good way? That character had at least seven seasons of build up, we find out that she was in one at one point engaged and has a child and now less than 7 episodes before the series finale we find out she stutters?

    Also taking your lead, I found some more tributes:
    Alan Alda: https://mobile.twitter.com/alanalda/status/970386672394391553
    Loretta Swit: https://www.dropbox.com/s/xnfezgnggyug7dr/Loretta remembers David.pdf?dl=0
  15. D'Snowth

    D'Snowth Well-Known Member

    On a similar not, one episode that really irks me is B.J. falling in love with the lady war co-respondant. Mike Farrell wrote and directed that episode, and it's just a trainwreck that screams forced and contrived. I know Mike wanted to show that even faithful B.J. wasn't above temptation, and was also human, but he just really tried too hard to bash that message in with a mallet in this one: they're both mutually attracted to each other, even though she knows he's married and yet continues to persue him making him feel all funny and awkward because he think she's so exciting since she's such a free bird.
  16. Princeton

    Princeton Active Member

    Not to
    Not to mention that whole plot was done a lot better in the earlier episode "Hanky Panky".
  17. D'Snowth

    D'Snowth Well-Known Member

    Exactly. There really was no need to rehash it all over again.

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