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Gluing Technique Help!

Discussion in 'Puppet News' started by HandySam, Feb 17, 2004.

  1. Buck-Beaver

    Buck-Beaver Well-Known Member

    Rubber latex is available at most art and craft supply stores. It's usually sold as a mold-making supply. It's not the same as foam latex, which is what is often used for special effects make up and animatronics and is harder to find.
  2. The Good Doctor

    The Good Doctor New Member

    Thanks again for the help.
  3. The Good Doctor

    The Good Doctor New Member

    Getting Started

    I have ben attempting to use ping pong balss for eyes. I read some where that that was what Jim Henson used at first to make his first puppets. The trouble I am having is attaching them to the head, and getting them to look more natural. I was wondering if any one has any suggestions.

    Thank you
  4. The Good Doctor

    The Good Doctor New Member

    Eyes

    Gang I am using Ping Pong Balls for eyes, I red that that was what Jim First ues and well they are working all right. I am trying to figure out how to create a blinking device does any one have a tips or tricks that are helpful.
  5. Show and Tell

    Show and Tell Member

    I've heard of several different types of contact cement that people are using to glue foam to foam. Now I have only ever used weldwood contact cement mostly because of its availability but I find it hard to keep the glued joints together for as long as it takes to cure so they don't come apart. The glue holds wonderful at first but then I leave it and come back latter to find that many of the joints are starting to come apart. The heat separates them but even just the pressure of a joint can pull em apart. Is there a better glue I can use? something that bonds instantly like weldwood? I've heard people use barge. I realize all contact cements fumes are bad but I've heard barge is the worst.
  6. Show and Tell

    Show and Tell Member

    I've heard of several different types of contact cement that people are using to glue foam to foam. Now I have only ever used weldwood contact cement mostly because of its availability but I find it hard to keep the glued joints together for as long as it takes to cure so they don't come apart. The glue holds wonderful at first but then I leave it and come back latter to find that many of the joints are starting to come apart. The heat separates them but even just the pressure of a joint can pull em apart. Is there a better glue I can use? something that bonds instantly like weldwood? I've heard people use barge. I realize all contact cements fumes are bad but I've heard barge is the worst.
  7. Iokitek

    Iokitek New Member

    do you press the foam parts you're glueing together? I use Bisonkit myself. It's just a standard brand here. But it works fine with me.
  8. Show and Tell

    Show and Tell Member

    Yes I do press the peices together. Although one would think with "contact cement" you wouldn't have too. Still yes I do because if I didn't the two pieces would simply fall completely apart. Weldwood works pretty much but I'm planning on making lots of puppets so I don't really have the time to let a puppet sit till I find out if it has cured with all the seams closed or not.
  9. Buck-Beaver

    Buck-Beaver Well-Known Member

    Couple of things...

    1. Make sure the contact cement you're using is supposed to be used on foam rubber (if in doubt call or email the manufacturer)

    2. You shouldn't press the pieces of foam together until the glue has tried to a point where it's tacky to touch, but none comes off in your hand. This usually takes anywhere from 3 - 15 minutes depending on temperature and humidity. If you do this properly the pieces should bond on contact.

    3. Don't use glue at temperatures above 35 degrees and below 10 degrees (celsius)
  10. Iokitek

    Iokitek New Member

    so I've been doing it wrong :p no wonder I have to press it together so long and hard. Another day. Another lesson learned.
  11. Show and Tell

    Show and Tell Member

    I use a hair drier to speed the drying time up a little
  12. Puppetplanet

    Puppetplanet Member

    Me Too! I think thats why all the hair is singed off my knuckles..... yes, women have hair on their knuckles too. But, it does save me money on waxing! :excited:

    Now.... about those eye brows. :eek:
  13. The Good Doctor

    The Good Doctor New Member

    Contact cement

    So what kind of contact cement should I use. I want to use what ever is the best.
  14. ravagefrackle

    ravagefrackle New Member


    Many use a product called BARGE, it might be hard to find though, try calling some shoe repair places and seeing if they will sell u some, it very smelly stuff, use ventilation, it also has a thinner that you can use to clean brushes, and remove small glue drips,

    i use DAP'Weldwood conact cement , works just as well as barge to me, but some dont like it,

    however it is easily avalible to find at your local home depot, and its cheap to, about 5 dollars for a 16 fl oz's, so if it dries up before you are done with it , you havnet spent too much, barge on the other hand is a little more pricey, and even with the thinner , at some point it will go bad, and if you didnt use all of it , your stuck with a can of rubbery goop
  15. Puppetplanet

    Puppetplanet Member

    Yep, I use the Welwood in gel formula because it's easier to control and avoid drips/spills. I've never had issues with it drying up, but I also run through about a can every 2-3 weeks too, so it may not ever get the opportunity to settle long enough to dry. Not sure how long of a "shelf" life it has. I think it may depend on variables such as climate. Mine tends to get watery during the summer months when it's really hot out.


    Anyone using this stuff really needs to pay attention to the ventilation advice. I store and use it only in the garage with the door wide open and fan blowing.
  16. Camellia

    Camellia New Member

    foam, glue etc.

    hi, yes, the other posts are correct. different foams need different glues. the wrong kind of glue can melt certain materials, including other plastics. some testing would work well in your own workshop. also, glue guns are just little heated globs of melted plastic. :) Use them for whatever they're appropriate with. Elmer's white glue (polyvinyl) won't stick to foam for the long term.

    Most plastic-type foams do deteriorate and crumble over time, so if you want archive quality puppets, you might want to do research quality materials and stuffings.

    good luck!
    Camellia
  17. Buck-Beaver

    Buck-Beaver Well-Known Member

    No respirator? :eek:

    Yikes, I hope you're not planning to have more children. There's carcinogens in that stuff!
  18. Puppetplanet

    Puppetplanet Member

    Nope no respirator, but we're talking a garage door here, not a regular wall door and the fan is behind me blowing toward the door. I never smell the stuff.

    I've got three perfectly healthy children, so it's never been an issue.
  19. Buck-Beaver

    Buck-Beaver Well-Known Member

    Well I was exaggerating about the having more children thing, but not much.

    This is not so much a direct reply to Michele but a general comment on the whole contact cement/respirator isssue...the fumes in contact cement can cause headaches, damage your nasal passage, compromise your immune system and are suspected to cause cancer...and that's just the first few that pop in to my head.

    I will readily admit that occasionally when I am in a rush I don't always use every safety precaution - but I should. Just having a ventilated workspace is not good enough if you want to properly protect your health. People are of course free to do what they want but I would strongly, very strongly encourage everyone here who uses contact cement to wear a respirator. It's also a very good idea to wear some kind of gloves or at least barrier cream to protect your skin as it's actually more harmful to have contact cement on your skin than it is to inhale the fumes.
  20. Puppetplanet

    Puppetplanet Member

    Hmmm, I never knew about the skin contact thing. But I just noticed that it says that on the can too. :o


    Wonder what kind of gloves would be acceptable without hindering the ability to work. Wouldn't think rubber gloves would be suffient huh? I do get a bit on my hands about 95% of the time, not much, but then again only a little bit can go a long way with that stuff.

    I just figured if the fans were helping to keep me from smelling it then the fumes arn't causing any damage. I just don't forsee realistically being able to work with a big gas mask hanging from my face. Where the heck would you get something like that tho? The little white fiber things at Home Depot aren't the kind that filter out that kind of stuff.

    -M

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